Scott administration suspends bill that extends minors status to 19-year-old Vermonters

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Vermont Gov. Phil Scott suspended the legislation on Wednesday over concerns that some 19-year-olds are simply too dangerous to be charged as minors. The bill is called “Raise The Age. Last year, Vermont became the first state to pass this type of law, which considers most 18-year-old offenders to be minors. A recent push for reform of that legislation, however, would have included 19-year-olds. “These are really serious crimes that often require a little more supervision than perhaps provided by the juvenile justice system,” Rory Thibault, attorney for the State of Washington County. ”Thinking back to legislative leaders and their intentions, I think they had the good idea to provide opportunities for young people who make mistakes not to face lifelong consequences. to treat most of these elderly people. “The system has to meet the needs of these people, so when we have particularly high risk cases,” Thibault said. “I think this is where there has been the frustration of victims of crime, state prosecutors and also some members of the community who feel that there are no appropriate means of holding individuals accountable or rehabilitating them. “The Vermont ACLU disagreed with the Scott administration’s decision. Executive Director James Lyall told NBC5 on Wednesday in a statement:” The The administration’s proposal Scott should be a non-starter – it would be a glaring error and a betrayal of Vermont’s commitment to building a smarter, more humane criminal justice system. Rather than pushing back on Vermont the administration should focus on addressing the very real crises this state faces – including housing shortages, an opioid epidemic, and chronic failure to invest in health systems. mental. allows people as old as 22 to go through confidential family court proceedings, instead of the adult court system. We contacted the governor’s office, but our request was forwarded to DCF. They have yet to respond to this request for comment.

Vermont Gov. Phil Scott suspended the legislation on Wednesday over concerns that some 19-year-olds are simply too dangerous to be charged as minors.

The bill is called “Raise The Age. Last year, Vermont became the first state to pass this type of law, which considers most 18-year-old offenders to be minors.

A recent push for reform of this legislation, however, has reportedly included 19-year-olds.

“These are really serious crimes that often require a little more oversight than the juvenile justice system can provide,” Washington County State Attorney Rory Thibault. “Thinking back to the legislative leaders and their intentions, I think they had the good idea to offer young people who make mistakes the opportunity to not suffer the consequences for life.”

State Attorney Rory Thibault said the juvenile system, especially the Department of Children and Family Services, was not equipped to handle most of these seniors.

“The system has to meet the needs of these people, so when we have particularly high risk cases,” Thibault said. “I think this is where there has been some frustration on the part of victims of crime, state prosecutors and also some members of the community who feel that there is no not the appropriate means to hold individuals accountable or to rehabilitate them. “

The Vermont ACLU disagreed with the Scott administration’s decision. Executive Director James Lyall told NBC5 on Wednesday in a statement:

“The Scott administration’s proposal should be a non-starter – it would be a glaring error and a betrayal of Vermont’s commitment to building a smarter, more humane criminal justice system. Rather than pushing Vermont backwards, the The administration should focus on solving the very real crises this state is facing – including the housing shortage, an opioid epidemic and a chronic failure to invest in mental health systems. ”

The Scott administration added that it also wanted to reform the Young Offenders Program, which allows 22-year-olds to go through confidential proceedings in family court, instead of the adult court system.

We contacted the governor’s office, but our request was forwarded to DCF. They have yet to respond to this request for comment.


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